Community, Going Zero Waste, Simplifying

5 Easy-Peasy Zero Waste Steps With BIG Impact

So you want to save the planet or maybe just a few sea turtles? Are you a Zero-Waster, or at least thinking about it? I like the term “Going Zero” because honestly, who’s “arrived” at zero waste!? There are not very many actual people {never mind FAMILIES} who can keep their year’s trash in a mason jar. In a consumer-based culture, it’s really all about our effort to move toward using less and keeping the landfills {& beaches!} emptier than if we never tried. This is, after all, the planet our kids will inherit!

As you may know, our family spent the summer a few years ago “Going Zero.” We made it our goal to buy less, share more {aka: clean house & donate!}, and change our habits for 3 months. It was an eye-opening experience. Now to be honest, we are pretty Dutch around here and if it saves a little moolah, then we are all-in. Therefore, we had already made several HUGE steps toward “Going Zero” including capsule wardrobes for the whole family, buying certain foods in bulk and/or from local farmers and growing/picking/making quite a few things ourselves. Still, we have a long ways to go and the summer was a great launching point for us to do a little more to preserve this planet that God gave us.

I thought ya’ll might be interested in a little recap from our summer and perhaps a few tips & tricks to try yourselves. Our strength lies in numbers when it comes to changing the world – both physically and spiritually, so lets link arms and do this thing together!

Stand united, singular in vision, contending for people’s trust in the Message, the good news, not flinching or dodging in the slightest before the opposition. Your courage and unity will show them what they’re up against: defeat for them, victory for you—and both because of God. There’s far more to this life than trusting in Christ. There’s also suffering for him. And the suffering is as much a gift as the trusting.

Philippians 1:27 b MSG

Now that I’ve made my point that Going Zero is clearly biblical *wink, wink* let’s get started! Going Zero is about creating less waste and a lovely byproduct will be the simplifying of your house and life! Less is more, my friends!

#1. Clean House: And I mean clear it alllllll out! A grand purge of all things cluttering my view helped me to start our journey. I have been simplifying and buying less over the past few years in an attempt to become Minimalist. I don’t think I’ve attained any sort of Marie Kondo status, but it sure feels good to have less “stuff” to pick up at the end of the day and more time to relax. I did another round of purging before summer started and let me tell you, our summer was MUCH more refreshing without the extra toys, clothes and clutter; less fighting, less chores, less cleaning, more visual space, more motivation to get outside. I even did my best to use up all those plastic bottles and partial boxes of processed foods in the fridge and pantry, so we could start with a clean slate. {My aesthetic eye was so happy to see the ugly mis-matched packaging traded for these 1/2 gallon Ball jars! Haha!}

#2. Make More: One thing I seriously love to do to create less waste is make my own. I figure if I can make my own version of something in less than a 1/2 hour, then why not? With a bread machine, I can measure and dump the ingredients in about 5 minutes then press go {0 plastic bags involved}. With lotion/chapstick/laundry soap I can melt, mix and pour in 15-20 minutes {the ingredients -which also last FOREVER- all come in paper/cardboard or minimal/reusable packaging}. If crafting is your jam: gift and home decor ideas are endless {bulk or zero packaging and no shopping bags}.

#3. Buy Bulk: When it comes to food, our goal is to consume “whole foods” anyway, so buying those whole foods in bulk is practical because each ingredient gets used in a dozen different recipes. There are millions of recipes out there to make your own of just about anything. We’ve tried granola bars, nut butters, from-scratch brownies, cake & frosting, vanilla/mint extracts, condiments & dressings, jam, even making your own chex mix is saving a little plastic from entering the planet since you can buy bulk pretzels, butter/coconut oil & spices and package it in your own containers. My fave bulk shopping places near Kalamazoo: Bloomingdale Bulk Food & Bent-N-Dent {speaking of bent-n-dents we have several close to Kalamazoo that are keeping literal TONS of food from becoming waste and saving people loads of money. You might want to scope them out!} the People’s Food Co-op {no membership required}, Sawall’s, and the Natural Health Food Store.

#4. Plant something! Indoors or outdoors, a few plants will help the environment in so many ways! Indoor plants add beauty without plastic or clutter and clean the air in your house. When you want to redecorate, just move them round or trade with someone! A seasonal outdoor garden can supply you with fruits and veggies, herbs, tea, sweet-smelling decor and a hobby that gets you fresh air and exercise! {Don’t even get me started on the natural habitats you’re providing and the power of plants to literally save our atmosphere.} I promise it’s not difficult to plant and harvest a few things to last you all year. Start with one plant and you’ll be hooked.

#5. Buy a few staples: Here are 5 of my “family necessities” for using less single use plastic. {We’re going to assume you already have a million Mason jars, because that is the most obvious #1 necessity 😆}

  • Silicone Ziplocks in every size {they’re great for everything from school snacks to freezing summer produce to use all year}
  • Snack sized tupperware for school {yes, they are totally plastic, but I’m sure not going to trust my 7 year old with glass in a backpack! We have enough for three kids’ lunches & snacks for a week and I fill them on Sunday afternoons with our chex mix, homemade muffins, produce and bulk snacks}
  • Food Processor {I promise it will be worth it’s weight in gold if you make your own nut butters or granola bars or even shredding/slicing/chopping produce since you’re buying/growing it all whole now. This tool is a game-changer/time saver}
  • A fun bag to carry your water bottle, travel mug, reusable shopping bag, stainless steel straws and utensil pack {I know these are all total hippy things. I’m sorry. But there is serious waste that happens when we are out & about and impulsively stop for something to eat/drink/buy. A cute bag helps you to be prepared for anything and hides/accents that hippy vibe depending on your personal taste. Haha!}
  • Small tins for homemade beauty goodies. {I use them when I make lotion bars to take in my purse, make my own lip gloss/toothpaste/deodorant, travel with shampoo bars or diy face wash, and these are the perfect carry-all for odds and ends like vitamins, bobby pins, buttons – you name it!}

I’m so glad we spent the summer experimenting to find out what we were capable of. Some of the things we tried and completely stuck with it while some things are more seasonal {I bake my own muffins WAY more in the summer/fall but tend to slack off once winter hits}. I’m also glad we splurged and bought a few items to make Going Zero a little easier and sometimes a little prettier too ❤ We’re set up for success whenever the inspiration comes to try something else new! Now tell me, what have you done already that kept a little trash out of our oceans? What are your fave tips & tricks to use less plastic? And what are you going to try next!?

Creativity Unleashed, Food for a Family, Going Zero Waste, Never Enough House Plants

Food-Scrap Gardening

Ok, ya’ll know I married a dutchman, right? So FREE is a word we Schuiteboers love. {Also, we love to eat.} Also, if I’m doing my best to not create waste, then I’m going to use what I have to the very last little bit, am I right? Put these seemingly random concepts together and you have a food scrap garden! I’m afraid to admit, this theory fills me with ecstasy!

I have experimented for years with crazy plant ideas that I find on the internet around midnight and “save for a rainy day.” Never mind the fact that I constantly try to grow things {especially FREE things} despite my black thumbs. You’ll notice in the following photos that there are an endless supply of seeds and pods on my window sill drying only to be germinated in water and/or stuck in a pot and watered {mostly to no avail}. I just HAVE to try… I can’t not try… If you could see my mother’s breathtaking gardens you’d understand I have a lot of inspiration and absolutely none of her gardening organization or follow-through. But I find my own ways to grow and nurture the things around me.

So here are some of my most successful attempts at Food Scrap Gardening. I would love nothing more than to hear your attempts, trade a few secret {or not-so-secret} tips and all of us can buy/throw away a few less items in the process.

Avocado Tree:

We’ve all tried it. I know you have too. It’s really a 50/50 venture. If I’m going to try it at all, I will try it with all the pits I’ve got because along the way a few will fail. It’s not difficult to start a root. I found this little tip recently: start them off in a baggie with a damp cloth on a cool dark shelf, check it after a few days and add water if necessary to keep it moist. When a root sprouts you can either put it directly in dirt {somewhat successful} or let it grow half submerged in water a bit first {more frequently successful} until you see a green sprout on the top. The roots grow pretty long so a big jar and even bigger pot are required…remember it’s a TREE. And no I don’t have a pretty photo of a successful tree for you. Mine just died without documentation {hence the attempts to grow a new one, haha!}.

Basil:

Yum-O! I love pesto… On sandwiches, pasta, pizza, chicken, toast, in a vinagrette. I love pesto. We also add fresh basil to cheesey party dips, egg scrambles, summer salads and sangria. You understand how we can’t keep enough of it in the house? Basil is easily grown from seed but did you know you can also grow a whole bushy plant from the stems at the grocery store? And if you purchase a little plant at the garden center, you can easily multiply it to have a whole row of basil in your garden this summer. Trim the basil stem just above a set of leaves. You can see the photo on the left has little “stumps” where I hacked it off. Then stick the stems in water and wait a few days. The roots grow out like little hairs all over the stem {these babies are quick and prolific} and when they get a solid half inch or so long you can stick them in the ground or a pot and voila! You have more *freeeee* basil plants. Keep trimming the tops and your plants will get full and bushy with endless tender leaves.

Onions:

I know, onions are no fun. They’re just so normal. But the truth is: they’re a staple. We are going to use them and quite often we buy a big bag and half of them sprout or go soft. Here’s how to save the onion AND produce more onions when you see a sprout. As soon as you can, cut off the outer layer of the onion while carefully not cutting the center. It helps to slice a side of the onion and peel the outer layers until you get to the center. It’s a little more difficult to cut up the outer layers for cooking now because they’ve been peeled, so a food processor is probably best to chop those pieces. There may be a layer or two that has started to soften so throw those in the freezer for veggie broth later and chop the good stuff for your weeknight dinners. The lovely little centers with roots still intact {pictured below} can now be planted! I have planted them in the spring for summer harvest, in the middle of the summer for a smaller-sized fall harvest {still totally worth it!} or in the fall and they keep growing once spring comes again. I’ve tried every size, color and variety, organic and non-organic, they all grow. You can even see some of the onions below were sprouting all winter and already had pretty decent roots growing up inside the onion layers.

Tops and Greens:

You know the veggies where we eat the root and discard the top? Well the top is actually super nutritious! Just like spinach or kale or whatever greens you would usually put in a salad or chop up for soups and stews, these greens are packed with vitamins A & C, magnesium, calcium, iron, and believe it or not, protein too! Well, here is what amazes me even more: They don’t need the full root to grow! This is not an endlessly sustainable plant like the onions, but a second and even third harvest are no problem for these veggie tops. When you buy full carrots, beets, radishes, turnips, etc use those greens if they’re still attached. Then whether there is green already or just a nub, cut off the tops of your root veggie and place it in a shallow bowl {or jar lid, like me!} and keep just enough water in it. Those tops will keep on growing and you’ll have extra garnish for your fancy dinners, a variety of textures in your salads and loads of free vitamins for your smoothies.

Pineapple Tops:

I apologize in advance, this one is not edible. {Sorry if I made you cry.} But it is pretty… AND free! I love the look of pineapple tops. I may or may not have been accused of buying pineapple weekly just for decor… {I tell the fam it’s our extra vitamin C to boost our immune systems, but now you know the truth.} The green/grey foliage and spikey layers just make me swoon and it’s easy peasy to grow them in water or soil. Cut the top of your pineapple right off with the green and then you can easily peel the yellow/brown away and you’re left with just a stalk of leaves. Sometime you will already see some little white roots growing along the leaves. I usually peel the lowest few leaves off and find more roots. Then you rest the top in a jar half filled with water so there is no water touching the stalk. {If the water gets on the stalk bottom or in the leaves it will just rot and turn into a stinky, soggy mess.} Just like the basil, you can plant these pretty little diddy’s in a pot once you see a good half inch of roots. Be careful to only give it a few teaspoons of water each week. Pineapple plants do not like to be wet. The roots will rot quickly if you overwater.

Those brown tips often happen when starting a new plant. More sun/less water, please!

Citrus Trees:

One more non-edible house plant. Some people SAY you can force citrus trees to produce in MI, but I’m not buying it… Either way, I love the smell of these citrus-y leaves and the ability to prune the little trees into fun shapes. Like avocados, I save all the seeds I can find in a fruit and attempt to sprout them all. Moment of truth: I have a little tin of dirt that I keep hidden on the counter and press seeds into it frequently to see if they’ll germinate. I know it’s not truly scientific, but experimenting makes me happy. Harvest those seeds. {I’ve sprouted limes, lemons, grapefruit, and oranges.} Let them dry out completely then tuck into some good soil and water weekly. The soil should not be wet & soggy. Now if you google this topic you’ll see some very extensive instructions to get these little gems to germinate. You can try it. I never have. I just dry ’em and put ’em in dirt. Take note: they are slow growing plants at first, it takes about 2 weeks to get a sprout, so keep watering and watching.

This little Blood Orange tree is almost a year old.

Ok, give me some feedback! Who out there has tried to grow some scrappy little plants!? What have you seen on Pinterest that you’ve been meaning to try? What are you going to stick in water/soil and try to grow next??

Creativity Unleashed, Going Zero Waste

Rescuing Beauty : My Favorite Trash-to-Treasures!

Does anyone else out there love to pick through the piles!? It’s a treasure hunt of grand proportion to scan heaps of castoffs and see what potential lies there unnoticed by the naked eye. Only a true beholder of beauty could see the recycle bin and think “That’s just what I’ve been looking for!” Only the slightly crazed will rummage through the leftover junk of an estate sale or the side of the road bulk pick-up and become so inspired with projects that all plans are forgotten and the kids are forced to fend for themselves for the next few meals.

However, I do understand those of you who see the results of such creativity and WANT to be so inspired. I hear you telling me you WISH you could find a diamond in the rough. I get it. I too, have felt the green eyed monster of jealousy when I see a glorious shabby chic garden gate hung on the wall as vintage art and realize it cost only the price of the nail it hangs on. I’ve been there.

Here’s my greatest lesson in this area: Imperfection is the the key to rescuing beauty! I used to see wonky furniture or broken-glassed window panes, items with cracks and holes and stains and think all was lost… until I looked closer through the green eyed monster to see that other’s “treasures” were also imperfect. They were just EMBRACED ANYWAY.

** Life application time ❤ How true this is about myself! I love imagining God who sees my chips, cracks and splotches and embraces me anyway. He designed each of us as we are ON PURPOSE- no mistakes! And He loves the PROCESS of our growth and redemption. Just as a broken gate can be celebrated and elevated as beauty, so can we. Life is a process of becoming more like Jesus and perfection is not the expectation. **

This is me practicing selfies because I am never satisfied… All I see are the chips and cracks, but God sees beauty!

Soooooo my fave trash to rescue on a regular basis?? Here’s a little list that can make a big impact on your home decor. Take it with you the next time you stop at a yard sale or run into the thrift store and I KNOW you’ll find some gems:

  • Small ceramics – seasonal animals, funky shaped vases, churches or small house shapes. These little things can be sprayed with $4/can high gloss paint and set in groupings or placed on a mantle. You won’t be disappointed.
  • Anything Wood – Shelves, boards, bowls, spoons, big ol’ baskets… all of these things are easily transformed by a smear of this fabulous spoon butter or with a quick coat of paint and some rough sanding for a shabby chic look.
  • Picture Frames – Ok, we’re talking seriously cheap art here: a collection of 8×10 frames (usually $1.99-3.99 each) -with all different scrollwork or lines but painted one uniform color- can make an incredible collage. If the glass is broken, staple some inexpensive chicken wire on the back. Then you can easily change out kid’s artwork or free printables to fill the frames with inspiring quotes, graphics or sweet designs!
  • Furniture with unique lines/legs – This is a bigger project if you’re feeling ambitious. Any fully functional piece of furniture can be stained or painted or even just sanded to feel like new. I upholstered the funky footstool below with scrap fabric and sanded the rust off the legs to paint them grey. I love mismatched chairs, dressers with new hardware or bookshelves in fun colors. You could remove a scratched laminate top from any 70’s kitchen table and replace it with palette wood for outside dining. Your imagination sets the limit in this arena!

So what if we made treasure hunting even more accessible for the average person by repurposing your recyclables? Here’s my top 3 *quite literal* trash turned treasures:

  • Glass – dressing bottles, spaghetti jars, uniquely shaped yogurt containers (sometimes it’s even worth forgoing a 10¢ refund because of a fun embossed logo, label or colored glass!) I love to use them for flowers & branches around the house or gifting bouquets to neighbors. You can buy soy wax pretty inexpensively and fill your jars with it, add a few drops of essential oil, then melt it all in a double boiler for fresh, clean burning candles. I have rolled several clear bottles with paint on the inside to add a splash of color on a bookshelf and I’ve even been known to set a variety of glass containers in it’s own vignette.
  • Lidded plastic containers – It’s the perfect thing for sharing my love of food! My fabulous and thrifty mother in law is always sending home leftovers in an ice cream bucket or butter tub. Why not gift our loved ones with dinner or just cookies more often!? I love to use washi tape or a swipe of chalk paint to label a cottage cheese container and make it pretty.
  • Tin – Well, I started with tea tins and have digressed to tin cans, including everything in between! I love the look of gritty old metal especially when mixed with wood. My favorite use for tin is plants. Pots are nice but often pricey and almost always breakable, so if I could plant everything in old farm buckets, I would! A nice compromise is the varying shapes and sizes of recycled tin cans (with a few holes poked in the bottom for drainage).

I’m hoping you feel inspired. I’d be the happiest person in the world if you would all send me a quick selfie of your (upside down) self in the recycle bin finding treasures you didn’t even know you had! What are you going to pull out first? What’s your best trash-turned treasure!?

Going Zero Waste, Simplifying

Top Five 20 Minute Zero Waste Staple Recipes For the Family (Plus a delish coffee lover’s bonus!)

Time to roll up your sleeves, my friends! We’re going to do a little work- and I mean just a little! Here are my tried and true 20 minute or less Zero Waste staple recipes! Each delicious recipe will eliminate trash and/or recycling and won’t take you any time at all.

This is me being real. It’s my unedited pantry shelf. You can see we’re not completely plastic free yet, and I’m reusing all sorts of jars & lids instead of buying a cute set. But there is my homemade strawberry chia seed jam in the front and that almost empty jar in the back? Well, it’s time to make more pancake mix!

DIY Chicken/Veggie/Bone Broth – Definitely the simplest and least amount of effort here! (**I’m labeling this one as 20 minutes of overall effort – if that!**) Save any and all meat & veggie scraps from your regular cooking. Your leftovers determine your type of broth! Onion skins, chicken bones, pepper tops, celery leaves, herb stems and carrot ends all make yummy additions. Throw them in a big container in the freezer as you have them. When the container is full and contains a variety of goodness, put it in a crockpot and cover with water then simmer for the day. It will cook down a bit and become a nice rich color. Pour it through a strainer into recycled jars or even plastic lunchmeat or yogurt containers and freeze for future use. I keep several large containers on hand in the fall & winter for soups & chilis, then 1 or 2 cup size containers for regular dinner recipes. Broth lasts a loooooong time in the deep freeze. (& Here’s a more detailed recipe if you need more info with alternative methods.)

Pancake Mix – Who doesn’t love a big ol’ Saturday morning breakfast!? Collin & I get some bacon frying in the oven and whip up a double batch of these ‘cakes with blueberries and the kids wake up magically full of joy and eager to do their weekend chores. (Yes we shamelessly hold breakfast hostage until they’re done.) Unfortunately for the planet, the ease of a boxed pancake mix is undeniable, so make this mix ahead of time and measure it out as needed! 4 ingredients and 5 minutes of prep = super quick pancakes anytime you want ’em.

From Scratch Muffins – Going zero waste is absolutely more difficult if you have kids because kids love to snack and snack foods always equal individual wrapping and tons of single use plastic! Enter: the homemade muffin! I got the original red-checkered Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook for our wedding (Eeeek! 15 years ago!) and this basic muffin recipe has been a fave ever since. The website has all sorts of variations but use your imagination! Cinnamon apple and banana chocolate chip are my kid’s faves! We bake a batch twice a week or double it and make it once. It’s a good snack for on the go and always pairs well with coffee when friends are coming over. (Make the streusel topping at the bottom of the page and people will think you’re real fancy! hahaha)

Chia Seed Jam – No pectin required! Only 3 ingredients, freezable or can-able (Is that a word?) and perfect for Healthy PB&J’s: Yum-O! I have made this exact recipe with Blueberries, Strawberries and Raspberries, all with grandiose success!

Easy Peasy Oat Milk – Here is a simple and quick recipe for easy oat milk. All you need is a blender and a strainer. I know many people have actual nut milk bags, but I like to minimize my kitchen gadgets and a simple mesh strainer works for any alternative milk recipe just as well!

***BONUS***Coffee Creamer – Now that you have some freshly made sweet and creamy oat milk, use two cups of it for some incredible chemical-free creamer! I’ve used this recipe for YEARS and although it calls for half & half, I have used every variety of store-bought or homemade milks and every natural/old-fashioned sweetener and it still turns out! It’s a great balance of not-too-sweetness and lovely froth when you shake the jar before pouring it into your coffee. It’s refreshing in your afternoon pick-me-up cold brew and soothing in a hot cuppa Joe before the kids are up. Try making it with some local maple syrup and your fresh oat milk and I promise angels will sing.

…sooooo creeeeeeaamy!

Chef’s Note: Hopefully you are buying your flour and nuts in the big bag, which is great, because you’ll use them up in no time. To go one step further, find a local bulk food store and take your biggest Mason jar to fill up. Also, any leftovers or mess from baking can be thrown into your compost bowl. You’ve got one of those right? NOW you literally have ZERO waste!

For the skeptics: I will admit the flavors of home made are different from store bought (SOoo much FRESHER!!) but if you have a house full of kiddos, maybe make them one recipe at a time to test them out or tweak them as needed. I often sneak a little extra sweetness in a recipe at first then taper off each time I make it. OR my other sneaky strategy for introducing new flavors is to make just enough for me and allow the fam only a taste of what I’m eating. Then they want a little more and they’ll just have to wait for the next batch. (Insert evil mom-laugh for using reverse psychology FTW once again!)

OK, start the conversation, folks. Which recipe are you going to try? Do you already have a fave recipe that reduces kitchen trash!? (Who’s got a “bottom of the jar” recipe from Rachel Ray for us!?)

Going Zero Waste, Simplifying

Tiny Garbage Bins Are In

Well if you’ve been to my house, you know I have a tiny garbage bin. I always have. It’s a little bitty one that a grocery store bag fits in perfectly and it only holds a day’s worth of trash so we have the extra motivation to take it out at night and our cupboard never gets stinky.

I have endured some teasing for said garbage bin (when I used paper plates at a party and only two fit in the bin before the bag needs to be replaced) and I even attempted to upgrade it to a lidded version (when Buddy learned how to open the cupboard and help herself to a trashy little snack… the lid did NOT help this situation) but this tiny bin has been with me since we got married and moved into our first little pink house (don’t tell the hubs! We refer to it as “Salmon” when he’s around!). Needless to say, I like my tiny garbage.

I like how a tiny bin creates an awareness of what’s going in the trash (and eventually to the dump!). There isn’t room to put just anything in there and so we often have to consider other options. Could this “trash” go in the recycling instead? What if I flattened/took apart or repurposed this item? And why did I even end up with this trash? Could I have made a different purchase to avoid it ending up here?

Perhaps this is more thoughts about trash than you’d like to hear. (I promised to say a little too much, remember!?) But it leads me to the confession that I’ve always been a “zero-waster”, and now there is finally a cute name for it! So let’s be honest, no one can possibly create “zero waste” (If my garbage ever actually fits in a mason jar, I’ll let you know. At this point we’re FAR from it!!) but it’s really about the process of lessening our impact on the earth and creating a life of LESS stuff/ MORE experiences. This philosophy flows so beautifully with my dreams of the simple life and natural remedies and hand-making everything so that I KNOW what’s in it!

And so I’m continually on a journey to simplify the things that enter our house and use/waste less. I’m sure you’re all familiar with the beginning steps (who else watched Captain Planet and stuck around long enough to hear the planet saving tips at the end!?) but perhaps you’d like to try (or try again!?) a few of them?

  1. Fabric Shopping Bags ~ Duh! It’s kind of old news by now. We all have them, It’s remembering them that’s hard! And have you tried the mesh produce bags yet? They actually do keep your food fresher longer!
  2. Less Paper Products ~ All those pretty plates someone bought off your wedding registry? Use them! Old towels/dish clothes you recently replaced? Use those instead of paper towels for messes. Bring your own coffee cup/stainless tumbler when you go out.
  3. Buy Bulk~ Of course you can find a good bulk food store and bring your own containers. (It’s not that hard, it just FEELS like an extra step…and maybe requires some forethought.) But it also makes sense to buy one large PB rather than two small ones (I promise it won’t go bad before the kids can consume it!). Or you could get the bigger bag of fresh fruit/veggies and freeze some for smoothies rather than buying yet another plastic bag of pre-frozen produce.
  4. Make your own!~ Do you have a favorite thing that you buy all too often and it comes in a non-recyclable container? Go Straight to Pinterest and find a recipe to MAKE IT. Yes, you can do it. I’ve tried it all: Almond/Rice/Soy/Oat Milk, nut butter (EVERY kind!), granola bars, lotion, facewash, sunscreen, bathroom cleaner, dog shampoo- the options are endless! For some tried and true recipes check out my Pinterest board “Going Zero.” And there are millions of more ideas out there. Sure you may fail, but you’re closer to zero waste than you were before the attempt. And usually whatever ingredients you used come with plenty extra to make several batches, so try again!

So crazy enough, my family of 5 has commited to not buying plastic this summer! We’re giving it a go for 3 months to see what we can change and learn and what kind of a difference we can make. To give you an idea of how it’s going I’ll just smile and forget to mention that my first shopping trip contained enough ball jars of ingredients to make my own bread, mustard, protein bars, nut butter and 5 dinners worth of meat wrapped in paper… PLUS a slip-n-slide…. Oops! But we’re learning and making changes and hopefully I won’t get suckered in by the kiddos after an exhausting 4-store shopping trip where my brain did Yoga trying to figure out how to buy things in different packages again!

Now which steps have you conquered and which are you going to try? (And how big is your garbage bin??)